ActiveBlog

Test Drive: Drupal Deployment on Eucalyptus
by Harold Spencer Jr.

Harold Spencer Jr., March 19, 2013

This week, ActiveBlog invites Harold Spencer Jr. to share a blog discussing how to deploy Drupal on Eucalyptus, using Stackato, Amazon Route 53, and the Eucalyptus Community Cloud.

Recently, I did a blog discussing how to deploy a Jenkins server using Stackato, running on Eucalyptus. At the end of that blog, I mentioned how the Eucalyptus Community Cloud (ECC) could be used for testing out the Stackato Microcloud image on Eucalyptus. The previous blog – I felt – was more for DevOps administrators who had access to their own on-premise Eucalyptus clouds. The inspiration of this blog comes from the blog on ActiveBlog entitled “Deploy & Scale Drupal on Any Cloud with Stackato” to show love to Web Developers, and show the power of Amazon’s Route 53.

Test Drive Pre-Reqs

The prerequisites for this blog are the same that are mentioned in my previous blog regarding using Stackato on Eucalyptus (for the Eucalyptus pre-reqs, make sure the ECC is being used). In addition to the prerequisites mentioned above, the following is needed:

After the prerequisites have been met, its time to setup the Drupal environment.

Test Drive Engage!

Since the ECC is being used, there is no need to worry about bundling, uploading and registering the Stackato image. The Stackato image used for this blog is as follows:

IMAGE emi-859B3D5C stackato_v2.6.6/stackato-cloudinit.manifest.xml
150820662310 available public x86_64 machine eki-6FBE3D2D eri-67463B77 instance-store 

Next, lets make sure the user has an elastic IP that will be used in AWS Route 53, and a security group to allow proper network traffic to the instance. Do the following:

1. Make sure the user credentials are sourced correctly, and euca2ools is installed correctly.

2. Grab an elastic IP using euca-allocate-address (in this example 173.205.188.105 was allocated):

# euca-allocate-address
ADDRESS 173.205.188.105

3. If the user already doesn’t have a keypair, create a keypair for the user by using euca-create-keypair, and make sure the permission of the file is 0600:

# euca-create-keypair hspencer-stackato > hspencer-stackato.priv
# chmod 0600 hspencer-stackato.priv 

4. Create a security group for the instance to use:

# euca-create-group stackato-test -d "Test Security Group for Stackato PaaS"
GROUP stackato-test Test Security Group for Stackato PaaS

5. Authorize ping, ssh, http, and https ports:

# euca-authorize -P icmp -t -1:-1 -s 0.0.0.0/0 stackato-test
GROUP stackato-test PERMISSION stackato-test
ALLOWS icmp -1 -1 FROM CIDR 0.0.0.0/0

# euca-authorize -P tcp -p 22 -s 0.0.0.0/0 stackato-test
GROUP stackato-test
PERMISSION stackato-test ALLOWS tcp 22 22 FROM CIDR 0.0.0.0/0

# euca-authorize -P tcp -p 80 -s 0.0.0.0/0 stackato-test
GROUP stackato-test
PERMISSION stackato-test ALLOWS tcp 80 80 FROM CIDR 0.0.0.0/0

# euca-authorize -P tcp -p 443 -s 0.0.0.0/0 stackato-test 
GROUP stackato-test 
PERMISSION stackato-test ALLOWS tcp 443 443 FROM CIDR 0.0.0.0/0 

6. Now, launch the instance, specifying the keypair name to use, and a VM type. On the ECC, only m1.xlarge and c1.xlarge meet the requirements of launching the Stackato image:

# euca-run-instances -k hspencer-stackato -t c1.xlarge emi-859B3D5C -g stackato-test

RESERVATION r-66EE4030 628376682871 stackato-test

INSTANCE i-E85843C4 emi-859B3D5C euca-0-0-0-0.eucalyptus.ecc.eucalyptus.com euca-0-0-0-0.eucalyptus.internal pending hspencer-stackato 0 c1.xlarge 2013-02-24T19:40:35.516Z partner01 eki-6FBE3D2D eri-67463B77 monitoring-disabled 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 instance-store

7. Once the instance gets to a running state, associate the elastic IP that the user owns to the instance:

# euca-describe-instances
RESERVATION r-66EE4030 628376682871 stackato-test
INSTANCE i-E85843C4 emi-859B3D5C euca-173-205-188-106.eucalyptus.ecc.eucalyptus.com euca-10-9-190-24.eucalyptus.internal running hspencer-stackato 0 c1.xlarge 2013-02-24T19:40:35.516Z partner01 eki-6FBE3D2D eri-67463B77 monitoring-disabled 173.205.188.10 10.9.190.24 instance-store

# euca-associate-address -i i-E85843C4 173.205.188.105
ADDRESS 173.205.188.105 i-E85843C4

# euca-describe-instances
RESERVATION r-66EE4030 628376682871 stackato-test
INSTANCE i-E85843C4 emi-859B3D5C euca-173-205-188-105.eucalyptus.ecc.eucalyptus.com euca-10-9-190-24.eucalyptus.internal running hspencer-stackato 0 c1.xlarge 2013-02-24T19:40:35.516Z partner01 eki-6FBE3D2D eri-67463B77 monitoring-disabled 173.205.188.10 10.9.190.24 instance-store

8. Log into the AWS management console, select Route 53, and setup the A and CNAME records in your domain as mentioned here under the Stackato Documentation regarding detailed DNS configuration. In this example, the DNS name associated with the elastic IP 173.205.188.105 is stackato-dev.mindspew-age.com.

9. Next ssh into the instance, and proceed to follow the steps for setting up the Stackato instance that is mentioned in my previous blog under the section Configuration of the Stackato Instance. Make sure the DNS name setup in AWS Route 53 is used with “kato rename public-DNS-name” and “kato setup core api.public-DNS-name” configuration steps.

10. After the instance is configured, just open up the browser and go to the DNS name set up for the Stackato instance in AWS Route 53, as mentioned in the Stackato Documentation regarding configuration via the Management Console.

11. Once logged into the Stackato Management Console, select “App Store” in the lefthand menu and select “Drupal” to install

12. After Drupal has installed, start the application. Once it has started successfully, select the URL that shows up in the right-hand menu box. The Drupal log-in page will appear in your browser.

Thats it! Now Drupal is ready for any web developer to test out on the ECC. If there is any questions/comments/suggestions, please feel free to leave comments. Enjoy!

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Guest blogger Harold Spencer Jr. joined Eucalyptus Systems, Inc. in 2010 as a Technical Support Engineer. He focuses on deploying enterprise services using cloud computing infrastructures and identity management in the cloud.