ActiveState Blog

  • Komodo 10.1 Beta Now Available

    The Komodo 10.1 beta is now available. This is a big update that focusses primarily on what our community has been asking us for. Over 100 bugs were fixed and more will be addressed before this release turns stable. While the vast majority of our effort has been focussed on community requests, we did also work on some creative vision of our own.

  • HotKey Conundrum

    As you may know by now (or maybe you don't, which is ok since I'm going to follow up by stating the fact anyway...), Komodo has been in development for over 15 years now. There is an incredible amount of functionality in Komodo that I myself am still learning about (having joined the dev team relatively recently). As each new feature was being added, it made sense to add a key binding to gives users quick access to it.

  • Case Study: Lua Debugging in Komodo

    I had thoughts about trying something crazy with Komodo...so when ActiveState held its annual hackathon I saw it as a great opportunity for me to try out one of these ideas. Before I jump into what I did, I want to touch on something I said in an earlier blog post about Komodo's impressive debugging functionality:

  • What's speed got to do with it?
    What Does Speed Have to do with it?

    “Interpreted languages are slow” is a common myth. Interpreted languages provide an increase in development speed but trade it off for a decrease in runtime performance. In other words, interpreted languages love developers and hate end-users.

    None of those beliefs is meaningful. It isn’t that they are true or false, it’s that they are incoherent. Languages are not running a footrace. They aren’t charging down a linear track together, all doing the same thing.

    We use different languages for very different things.

  • Webinar: The ActiveState of Tcl

    Millions of developers around the world use Tcl for rapid prototyping, scripted applications, GUIs, and testing. It’s everywhere around us - from routers, to network management tools to semiconductors. Yet Tcl remains one of the most unheralded and quietest languages in programming. But our intelligence tells us this is changing. Not only has Tcl jumped nearly 20 spots in the Tiobe rankings this month but it continues to be used in mission critical applications powering the world around us.

  • The Advantage of Komodo's Editor Over JavaScript Based Editors

    Nowadays, it seems that IDEs and text editors are to software developers as sports cars are to car enthusiasts. Ask any developer what tool they use to write their code and why, and you will get a million different answers. Developers also love to customize their tools, just like car enthusiasts love to pimp out their rides.

  • Go to Any Symbol With Komodo's New Symbol Browser

    As an IDE, one of the features that Komodo must have and must do well (IMO) is code intelligence. It MUST help you understand the code your working on more quickly (even if...ESPECIALLY IF it's yours).

  • Creating a Reverse Lookup Table for OTRS with ActivePerl

    Occasionally our customer service team wants to find the ticket that is related to a filename that was attached to an email that went through OTRS Free (the system we use to manage our customer-facing support tickets). As to be expected, we've accumulated a lot of tickets and a number of these include attachments and currently reverse lookup by attachment is not a feature in OTRS Free. We didn't want to modify OTRS and complicate future upgrades, so we decided to create a separate web UI to run an attachment search.

  • Filling the Gap with Commandline Integration - PhoneGap, Cordova, Grunt, Gulp

    Something that has always been part of the Komodo design philosophy has been integration. Though Komodo should provide tooling to make our users more productive, it should NOT try to do EVERYTHING. Integration, not imitation, is the key.

  • What’s Up Perl?

    Recently, Tom Radcliffe (ActiveState Director of Engineering) and Jason McIntosh, co-author of the O’Reily book "Perl & XML,” did a webinar about all things Perl. They wanted to talk about the origins of Perl, why it had become so invisible in recent years and where it was heading.

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